Below is a sample of the panels from the exhibit. Some of the comments have been transcribed and appear in the lower left corner. To pause, hover your mouse over the slideshow.


  • May God bless and keep all who's lives were changed forever in his loving arms!
  • Take this as a purging experience. We will come back renewed and restored!
  • My door's symbols will never be concealed. It is a badge of honor!
  • It may look like destruction...but a second life was created.
  • The great American city will rise...and once again New Orleans will be the place to be!
  • Play the blame game all you want - it'll never bring N.O. any less heartbreak.
May God bless and keep all who's lives were changed forever in his loving arms!1 Take this as a purging experience. We will come back renewed and restored!2 My door's symbols will never ben concealed. It is a badge of honor!3 It may look like destruction...but a second life was created.4 The great American city will rise...and once again New Orleans will be the place to be!5 Play the blame game all you want - it'll never bring N.O. any less heartbreak.6

WATERLINE - an interactive photo installation


"WATERLINE: an interactive photo installation" consists of photographs mounted edge to edge on white foam core panels with only the water line in each photograph aligned. The foam core panels are installed edge to edge around the perimeter of an exhibition space, again with only the water lines in the photographs aligned. The photographs are selected from 600 exposures made throughout the city of New Orleans, April 1 through June 10, 2006.

WATERLINE is an interactive exhibit. The comments you see above were written by viewers of the installation all around the state of Louisiana and in Florida using marking pens made available for that purpose. As the sample here indicates, viewers have responded to the exhibit with expressions of anger and hope, courage and grief, defiance and solidarity.

I began photographing the water line because it spoke powerfully to me of the devastation of a wonderful and irreplaceable city. This method of exhibiting the photographs was the best way I could think of to recreate the experience of being in post-Katrina New Orleans surrounded by the long, black, dirty line and the destruction it represented. I made it interactive to inspire debate and discussion about the events surrounding Hurricane Katrina.